Power Up! The Columbus Power Plant in Little Cottonwood Canyon

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Since at least the 1860s, entrepreneurs used the ample water supply found at the confluence of Little Cottonwood and Maybird and Hogum Creeks for industrial purposes, whether timber mills or the generation of hydroelectric energy.  The area in and around the current boundary of 42SL102 contains the remains of the …

Saber Rattling in Strawberry Valley: The 1888 Encampment of the US Army in Utah

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Written by Christopher W. Merritt, Ph.D., Utah State Historic Preservation Officer Over 900 soldiers from the Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery branches of the United States Army descended on Strawberry Valley in August of 1888 to engage in the first large-scale joint training exercises west of the Mississippi River. Typically, each …

Guest Blog: URARA

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We have a guest blog from the Utah Rock Art Research Association (URARA) this week! If you haven’t already heard of this organization, they are a fantastic group of people who are passionate about rock imagery! Utah Rock Art Research Association, (URARA) has replaced it’s monthly on the ground field …

What’s in a Name: Rock Imagery

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You may have noticed that we at UPAN and in the wider State Historic Preservation Office, we refer to “rock imagery” when discussing prehistoric/Indigenous petroglyphs, pictographs, and other culturally meaningful markings on stone. For many years “rock art” has been the preferred term used by archaeologists and other Western-educated scholars… …

Utah’s Prehistory in Artifacts

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Written by Erin Haycock Editor’s note: The artifacts you are about to see have all been looted, or stolen. Looting is the illegal removal of archaeological materials from archaeological sites. Not only is this illegal, but it strips artifacts of their scientific value and it debases their cultural value to …

Iosepa: Utah’s Pacific Islander Pioneers

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Benjamin C. Pykles, Historic Sites Curator Church History Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints “Hawaiians in the Utah desert! What?” This was my initial reaction when I first heard about Iosepa, a historic settlement in Skull Valley, Tooele County, established by Pacific Islander converts to The Church …

Archaeological Site Etiquette

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               If you’ve hiked, biked, rafted, or traveled anywhere in Utah, chances are you’ve found ancient ruins and artifacts, also called “archaeological sites”. An archaeological site is anything left by past humans. Sites can be rock art, pueblos, arrowheads, mines, cabins, trails, and much more! Utah has over 90,000 known …